My Sister’s DNA Admixture Test

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By , November 26, 2011 7:45 pm

My sister recently tested with 23andMe and shared her ethnicity results:

49%   European

46%   Sub-Sahara African

5%     Asian (Chinese)

I was thrilled that she tested with them during a free promotion (but that really was aimed at collecting medical data on African Americans). Mom, Uncle Bobby and my sister all exhibited a strong Asian phenotype. Since Mom and Uncle Bobby have passed on, there was no one left to prove or disprove the hypothesis except her. My own results showed only a 2% Asian admixture.

Photos of William Hutchinson Norris and James Reece Norris

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By , November 9, 2011 4:26 am

Received this email from Doc Jones back on 5/10/2011. See any family resemblance?

For a good many years there has been some conflict about photos of some of the early Norris Family Members…. I just got this from Francisco Daniel in Brazil and I am confident that the photos contained in this email are correctly attributed…I would appreciate it if you guys would send this email to other family members who are not in the sent to list…..Thank you very much……doc jones sends

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Kito <angelakito@uol.com.br>
To: Doc Jones <docjones35@bellsouth.net>
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2011 1:40 PM

William Hutchinson Norris and James Reece Norris

William Hutchinson Norris and James Reece Norris

 

Col. Frank W. Norris – 345th Field Artillery

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By , November 8, 2011 7:09 am

Sent an email to Doc Jones on 11/7/2011:

Doc,

Col. Frank W. Norris

Found this on Col. Frank W. Norris (born 1916 in Wharton Couty, TX) who was one of John Alexander Norris’ sons. If my scenario is correct, he would have been my GF’s great nephew and my 2nd cousin. He and my dad were about the same age and fought in WW II in France at the same time. I am doing more research on the 345th Field Artillery (Frank Norris) and the 519th QM Bn (my father Theodore Norris) to see where the units were in proximity to one another.

BTW, John Alexander Jr. attended West Point. Found snippet of an article on him in the West Point alumni magazine. Contacting the archivist to get a copy. His son John Alexander III died in Vietnam at age 25. Was living in CA at the time. Don’t know whether he was married or had children.

Still searching for a living descendant of Josiah Evans Norris.

Source: http://www.90thdivisionassoc.org/90thdivisionfolders/mervinbooks/345/34501.pdf

My African Ancestry Test Results

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By , June 26, 2005 1:13 pm

My matrilineal DNA results:

98.8% match with the Masa and Mafa in present-day Cameroon. My mother was Jamaican-Cuban. Her mother was from the town of Banes in Oriente Province, Cuba. While I know her gramdmother’s name I don’t know where she was from.

Have been doing a lot of reading on the Mafa, in particular, who are mountain people. One study reported in the Sep-Oct 2004 issue of the Annals of Human Biology revealed linguistic and genetic affinities of the Mafa and others with East Africa:

… Chadic-speaking groups of northern Cameroon share more similarities with the populations of the Upper and Middle Nile Valley and East Africa than with populations from Central Africa.

Interesting.

Have to keep in mind, however, that these mtDNA results only show about 1% of my total ancestry. Still, it’s very exciting stuff.

Source: Reposted on 11/9/2011 from the AfriGeneas African American DNA Research Forum

Dad’s African Ancestry Test Results

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By , June 9, 2005 2:23 am

Dad’s came in today:

Matrilineal:
100% with the Mende and Temne peoples in Sierra Leone, the Kru people in Liberia, and the Fulani people in Guinea-Bissau.

During a visit to West Africa a couple of years ago, a first cousin was told that she looked Fulani. Very interesting!

Patrilineal:
100% with people living in Germany and England. Not a surprise.

Still waiting for mine.

Source: Reposted on 11/9/2011 from the AfriGeneas African American DNA Research Forum

My Biogeographical Admixture Test Results

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By , May 25, 2005 3:54 am

Received the results of my admixture test from AncestrybyDNA last week:

Sub-Saharan African: 51%
European: 42%
Native-American: 5%
East Asian: 2%

Very interesting. But, just as with Dad’s previously reported results (SSA 42%, Eur 47%, EA 9%, NA 0%), my results raise more questions. I had expected to see a larger EA percentage reflecting my mother’s ancestry. Mom was of Jamaican-Cuban extraction and both she and her brother exhibited some Asian characteristics (which is pretty common in the Caribbean) as does one of my sisters. They were/is often mistaken for Chinese, Thai, Filipino, Hawaiian, etc. Even I have been called a Filipina once too many times and a friend once wrote me from Bangkok, “…all your people are here.” So, there’s something there but if my DNA results are to be relied upon, apparently their appearance wasn’t due to an EA genotype at all. Hmmmm. Strange.

Another mystery surrounds Dad’s missing NA heritage which is family lore but still undocumented. His DNA shows no NA ancestry at all . . . unless, of course, his EA results (where did that come from?) are really NA. This is possible because I understand from Toot and others that it is somewhat difficult to distinguish between the two.

But then NA shows up in my results. Either this is from Dad, confirming what we’ve long-suspected, or it is Amerind from Mom’s side, which might explain her (and her brother’s and daughter’s) Asian phenotype mentioned earlier since NA and EA are so close, genotypically speaking.

Still waiting for my matriclan test results and for Dad’s patriclan and matriclan tests from African Ancestry. I’m pretty sure that his Y will show no African ancestry (or just a trace) but I can’t wait to see where his mother’s line originated. Ditto mine since my maternal grandmother was from an area of Cuba where there a great deal of admixture between the native Indians, Europeans and African slaves. Er, that would’ve made her a typical Caribbean Hispanic, wouldn’t it?

Source: Reposted on 11/9/2011 from the AfriGeneas African American DNA Research Forum

Cousin Sam’s African Ancestry Test Results

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By , April 23, 2005 6:41 pm

Dad’s nephew, Samuel Coleman, sent me his African Ancestry results:

– On father’s side matched 100% with the Bubi people of present-day Equatorial Guinea.

– On mother’s side (my father’s 1/2 sister, same father) matched 99.4% with the Tikar people of present-day Cameroon.

Cousin was so excited. He called to request that Dad take the test so that he could have info on his maternal GF’s line. Was so excited to find out that I was one step ahead of him. Neither of us knew that the other was embarking on the same quest. He is going to do the admixture test to compare to Dad’s.

Interestingly, since our GF was at least mulatto, maybe even quadroon or octoroon, the Patriclan test (through African Ancestry) may show no african ancestry. In that case, the company will test GF’s results against other Euro databases for free.

Trying to get enough folks interested to do a family DNA project and so we can try to get a group discount. So far have two full first cousins (on Dad’s side) on board.

Source: Reposted on 11/9/2011 from the AfriGeneas African American DNA Research Forum

Dad’s Biogeographical Admixture Test Results

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By , April 23, 2005 6:27 pm

Received my father’s biogeographical admixture test results from DNA Print Genomics (AncestrybyDNA.com):

– European 47%
– Sub-Saharan African 44%
– East Asian 9%
– Native American 0%

The percentage of Euro admixture wasn’t too surprising. Even though Dad is brown-skinned and his mother may have had about 1/8 Euro ancestry, his father was at least mulatto . . . may even have been quadroon or octoroon.

The East Asian ancestry was interesting but if I read correctly it is considered a trace that shows up in many populations so isn’t too significant.

The shocker, however, was that Dad had NO Native American ancestry. One of my family stories is that Dad’s grandfather was of NA descent. The story specifically refers to the Creek (folks said Cree but it was more likely Creek since they’re from south-central Alabama). The confidence interval was 4-8% so I understand that he still could have up to 12% NA ancestry but that possibility is less than 2x as likely as his having 0%. I also undrstand that since every child inherits different combinations of genes from their parents, that any one of the other 7 of Dad’s full siblings may have exhibited NA ancestry. But since Dad is the last of his family, we will never know definitively.

Sent Dad’s african ancestry swabs off four days ago (and my own admixture test). Can’t wait. Brave New World!!!!

Source: Reposted on 11/9/2011 from the AfriGeneas African American DNA Research Forum

Military Records Arrive . . . Finally!

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By , September 19, 2004 12:16 am

Opened mail last week and found that Dad’s records from the Natonal Personnel Records Center had arrived. I was elated!

Among the papers was his citation for the Bronze Star with a “V” for valor. It read:

“For heroic achievement in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States. On September 1 1950 when an infantry batalion with which Sergeant First Class Norris was serving as liaison sergeant bore the brunt of a determined attack by hostile forces in the vicinity of Haman, Korea, an enlisted man was seriously wounded and in need of immediate medical attention. Normal channels of evacuation had been closed by the enemy who had encircled the position. Sergeant First Class Norris, heedless of the deadly fire, carried the wounded man through enemy lines a distance of two miles to a point where he could be evacuated. Sergeant First Class Norris’ outstanding courage and selfless regard for the welfare of his comrades reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.”

I’m a proud of him today as I was when I first read the original of this 45 years ago. Somehow the letter was misplaced which prompted my sending away for it. Also received a list verifying all the medals he was entitled to. The replacement medals came yesterday.

Trip to Alabama Archives

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By , June 25, 2004 6:17 am

Finally got over to Montgomery and the Archives. Wasn’t exactly a bust but didn’t find the breakthrough info that I was hoping for.

1867 Voter Registration List:
1867 Voter Registration Lists Available on self-service microfilm. This series was created in accordance with an act passed on March 2, 1867, “to provide for a more efficient government of the rebel States,” and particularly to extend suffrage to the millions of freedmen across the south. All adult black and white males who had sworn an oath of loyalty to the United States were eligible to register to vote. Included is the person’s name, race, length of residence in the state, county and precinct, the book and page where his oath is recorded, naturalization information, and reasons for rejecting some registrants. Arranged alphabetically by county, thereunder chronologically by date of registration.

Only able to look at this on microfilm which was unreadable for the precincts I’m researching. Archives in process of refilming and digitizing these records and was not able to look at actual registers. Told they are heavily water-damaged and quite fragile.

Loyalty Oaths 1867-8
Loyalty Oaths. In order to regain their voting rights under the Reconstruction Acts of 1867, men who had borne arms against the United States or otherwise actively supported the Confederacy were required to swear an oath of loyalty to the government of the United States. This series consists of bound volumes of the loyalty oaths from each county and from the major cities in the state. The oaths contain the voter’s name, county of residence, his oath swearing loyalty to the United States government, his voting precinct, and the voter registrar’s name. Arranged alphabetically by county. Some volumes are closed due to their fragile condition.

Not exactly a perfect substitute for the voter Registrations which also list race but at least something! Found great-grandfather:

    Clark Thomas No 1082 dated 2 July 1867

Also looked at the Chattel Mortgage Records (1870-1871) and the Chancery Court Minutes (1848-1868). Didn’t find anything on my main lines.

Tax Collector, Tax Abstracts 1907-1911 and 1912-1916
Alphabetical listing of the taxpayers of the county, a breakdown of assorted taxes, total taxes due, address of each taxpayer and fees assigned by assessor.

Found Robert Norris and J. Henry Norris. Both paid taxes on personal property. Neither owned any real estate. Sample entry for Robert in 1910:

    Beat 3 Receipt #859 Paid 10/28 Name Norris Robert Value Real Estate — Value Personal Property $180 Toal Taxes $2.52

Could not photocopy because these record books were in such fragile condition. Archivist suggested I photograph them. Took 36 pics. Got back on photo disc today. None of them came out ! !

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